Welcome to the real world!

So continuing my journey I am writing this post following a very busy week in the real world of physiotherapy. This week I have been working at one of the Worcester Warriors senior training camps (12-17) as their physiotherapist. It is fair to say that looking after 87 children is quite a feat and I apologise in advance for any spelling or grammar errors as my brain feels like mush. I was employed to work at the camp through the Markland clinic which is based in Swindon and Cirencester (http://www.marklandclinic.com/). The team at Markland have been a great help this week providing me with a fully kitted out pitch side bag (not many work places would do this) and a nice water proof jacket (which definitely came in handy). So I plan to exchange some of my experience of the camp to give you an idea of what I came up against.

The first day I was met with one of the Markland team called Mike who was there to give me the ins and outs of what I would be doing and introduced me to the team. I must say after working with the Rugby League team at University, which at a push had a max of 20 players playing a game, going to 87 kids was a bit daunting :-S ! But on the first day Mike stayed around and we had a manageable caseload between the two of us. The camp was at Malvern college so we all stayed in school accommodation and were very well catered for in the food department (Definitely need a permanent job to get myself  back into the routine of going to the gym after this week.).

Our normal day would start with an optional fitness session at 7am and finish at 10 pm although when in demand you can be called out at anytime for example when some of the kids get food poisoning at 4am… So long days but as a physio we weren’t required the whole time so we did get chance to have some wind down time. I was joined on the 2nd day by another physiotherapist called Charli Robertson at first I had been told by Mike that Charli was a student physio. I was thinking oh great that is all I need 87 kids and a student physio to look after now I will definitely be out of my depth. Luckily for me there was a mix up and Charli was also fully qualified and was studying for her MSc in Sports Medicine. I would say a very good person to have around!! Our job as the physio was to assess and treat anything that came our way from blisters to head injuries. I found the whole process a great learning curve, I have never had the opportunity to work with children except for the odd MSK outpatient referral so there was a lot of sussing out the real cause of problem. For example some kids would come saying they have leg pain yet could not pin point the exact point and everything would be painful however, most of the time with some magic spray the problem miraculously vanished ;)! I really did rely on my communication skills to adapt to the different age groups to be able to perform accurate assessments and treatments. (Though most of the time I just suggested we chopped their limb off which they weren’t too keen on.) On the flip side of presenting complaints some players would play down a problem and would not tell us until a few days later mainly I think because they did not want to be seen as weak to others or to not be seen by the coaches who were potential scouts. For example we had a fractured radial head which wasn’t investigated until 3 days after the incident, but after educating them all about the importance of telling us if there was a problem we had an influx of cases, which resembled a very busy A+E at some points of the camp.

So the main things I have taken away from this camp that I will implement into my future practice:

  • The importance of  adapting my communication with players, staff and parents.
  • I have revisited assessment, treatment and taping techniques.
  • I have established the importance of communication within the team. Making sure you can speak with the coaches can give you valuable information about the incident you are dealing with.
  • The importance of not underestimating or overestimating an injury. If something doesn’t seem quite right it is important to get a second opinion.
  • The importance of knowing your own scope of practice (As a newly qualified unfortunately I don’t know everything and sometimes just need a little reminder to bring some previous knowledge back to me, if you don’t use it you lose it.)
  • Finally it has got me back into writing clinical notes (which was so strange as no one was signing them)

So I have had an eventful few days but I have loved every minute of it as I am finally using my degree to do the job I have loved studying for the last 3 years.

Some of the benefits I received whilst doing this job:

  • I got to work with 2 great teams. (Worcester Warriors and the Markland Clinic)
  • I was able to go and watch a Worcester Warriors Match.
  • I received some free Worcester Warriors clothing (everyone loves a free t’shirt)
  • Contacts for future opportunities.
  • Finally complete job satisfaction with parents, players and staff ending the camp in high spirits.

For the next 2 weeks I will be covering another 2 camps which will be great. Next week will be a junior camp so (9-12) and the second will be a split camp 2 days junior and 2 days senior, so I will let you know if I have any interesting stories for you.

Below are some pictures from the camp:

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So back to the real world in the NHS I have had a reply form Birmingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Unfortunately this time I have been unsuccessful however, I will be on the reserve list if another post becomes available within the next 3 months so that is promising so I will keep my fingers and toes crossed :-)! Below are some of the questions I got asked in the interview (I can’t remember all of them):

15 min question paper

You have a 22 year old man who has been in an RTC and has a fractured femur and has had a dynamic hip screw to resolve this.

a)      Goals 1st day post op?

b)      Goals for discharge?

c)       2 days post admission the patient has been found to have a fractured clavicle, how does this affect your management?

You have a 28 bed ward and your band 7 has phoned in sick, you have the assistance of a band 3 assistant, what do you do?

What are the signs and symptoms of a contracted shoulder? What would your management and advice be?

What would your assessment be of a patient with Type 2 respiratory failure?

What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 respiratory failure?

What conditions would present with type 1 and type 2 respiratory failures?

Interview panel

Why this trust?

Why do you want to be a physio?

Tell us about your placements? Identify your weaknesses and learning needs.

How do you cope with stress?

How have you demonstrated you match the trusts visions and values?

Have you been involved in service improvement? How have you done this?

What would you do if a patients’ relative made a complaint that you weren’t giving them enough physio and that they had been told they would be seen 3 times a day? The patient also has dementia.

What defines a quality service? How can this be measured?

I really love the QE and I had a great placement on ITU and even when I went on an informal visit before my interview I was still shocked at how many different areas there were in the hospital that I wasn’t even aware of. I am still awaiting feedback from both Nottingham and Birmingham but when I receive it I will let you all know what I could have done differently and how this will change how I will prepare for future interviews . In the mean time before I start work on Monday I have another interview at Derby Hospitals NHS Trust at 8.30 am :-S (I am going to be the walking dead by the end of the week) and I have also applied for a bank job with Nottingham CIC Bank.

So I have plenty of stuff to fill you in with in the next couple of weeks, maybe I should say to the interviewer when they ask me why do I want to work their trust that I am fed up of writing my blog about interviews I didn’t get ;-)!

Again any comments are welcome or you can tweet me @LCphysio x

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4 thoughts on “Welcome to the real world!

  1. Hello!
    I have recently graduated from physiotherapy as well, so currently figuring out my next move! I was just wondering how you found out about the sports camps you have been involved with. Did they want you to have had a lot of previous experience within sports physiotherapy? Thanks

    • Hiya I found out on twitter they needed me to have a pitch side qualification and some pitch side experience as I was there was only two physio’s… I think they may be looking for some more people for upcoming camps if you want me to pass your email on Lucy x

      • Hi! Oh that would be amazing, yes please! I don’t have a pitch side qualification but have recently had an internship with a football team in Ghana where I had some involvement with pitchside treatment in friendly games. Thanks x

      • Hi Poppy unfortunately you would need a pitch side qualification as it is not covered within your scope of practice as a physiotherapist, you will also need csp and hcpc registration. Let me know. Lucy

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