Putting things in perspective!

This week I started my new job at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham and I survived!! My first rotation is on critical care… which for most new band 5’s, who have never done a placement on ITU I am sure would be petrifying! Especially since the QE has the biggest co-located ITU in the world holding 100 beds! …. Luckily for me it is the area I did on placement so it is not all new! (Though jogging my mind on respiratory has been quite as a task, as I last did respiratory placement in my second year). But I am happy as I know quite a few friendly faces which has been reassuring.

Image

 

So not only have a started a new job this week I have also moved into a new house, which means I can walk to work! I wouldn’t necessarily recommend doing both at the same time as it has been quite stressful getting everything organised, but everything seems to be back on track now ūüôā . On my first day I went to meet my line manager for an initial induction, I remember walking down to road with butterflies in my stomach and clammy hands wondering what the day would bring! I was given so much information in the morning regarding booking onto mandatory training and different contacts I needed… my brain had turned to mush and I had dates in my diary I couldn’t even relate to any more. But I figured it’s not worth worrying about as everything will get sorted in the end (I just hope I progress to a permanent contract after doing all of these training sessions!!)

Mid morning I got to go up onto the Unit. It didn’t feel too scary as I had been up there before so all the noises of monitors beeping and staff bustling seemed quite normal to me. I am currently on the rehab team on ITU which means I get to work across all the areas of intensive care which are Renal, Trauma, Neuro and Cardiac I think…. So as a new band 5 it is great opportunity to see all the weird and wonderful things! My team consists of two band 6’s and one band 8 so I am in a great environment to learn. We are currently involved in a research trial looking at early mobilisation in ventilated patients to see if this decreases patient length of stay in hospital. It is a very rewarding first rotation but¬†I am due to rotate again in November ¬†ūüė¶ (as I started mid way through), so I plan to write some objectives in line with the preceptorship scheme to achieve before I finish.¬†At the QE we have an in service every Wednesday… so it will be a good opportunity to share my learning experiences each week as I won’t be able to share patients stories for confidentiality’s sake.¬†

From just doing my first week on ITU, it really puts life in perspective. Although I have had a few things going in my personal life recently, compared to what some of the patients and families are going through it is nothing and it really makes you view things completely differently! 

Image

So back onto a positive note a permanent post has just become available at the QE so I have applied for that! I have had feedback from my last interview so fingers crossed it might lead to something else if I get an interview as there is a chance they might randomly select ūüôā (but now I have met the interview panel hopefully they won’t seem as scary :-S).¬†

Over the weekend I am at Physiotherapy UK so I am sure I will have a lot to talk about, I am really looking forward to catching up with friends and CSP student Reps! New grads can still go on a student rate and it is great 2 day conference of CPD. See the link below if you want more information:

http://www.physiotherapyuk.org.uk/

Thanks again for taking the time to read my post. Any questions or comments please feel free to contact me on here or tweet me @LCphysio .

Advertisements

Opening New Doors!

I have been really busy this week. Firstly, from finding out I have been offered a job at the QE, I have been house hunting like crazy. ¬†I knew I wanted to live in Harborne because it was walking distance to the hospital, the area was great to meet other young professionals and with Gerard also living in Harborne, communication would also be easier regarding organisation of CPD courses. ¬†The unfortunate thing is that because it is such a popular area, houses become available and go like hot cakes so I have struggled to even get a viewing on some. But I ¬†have found one which is only a couple of mins walk from the high st and 15 min from the hospital which will be perfect. I will be living with a 2 girls and 1 guy which will be great to meet some new people (can’t wait to start a new adventure!!!)

So after I had been to the house viewing on Thursday night, after training with West Brom, I had to drive to Loughborough University. Through networking I had been given the opportunity to assist Steve McCaig at the England Cricket U19 Profiling camp. Steve is looking to complete his PHd on causes of throwing arm pain in cricketers. The work was expenses paid so I was provided with accommodation and food which suited me. Now baring in mind that on the Rugby camps I have been sleeping in the school dorms, I kind of expected the same for the cricket (which would have been fine for me as long as I have a bed and a shower). But I turned up on the Thursday evening about 9pm to be presented with a lovely hotel room, I was thinking by this point maybe cricket is the sport for me :-)!

Image

First day of the Camp I had to meet Steve at 7am at the ECB cricket centre. With Steve being an Ozzy it was difficult not to gloat about the previous ashes test but I soon recognised he completely backed the England team through and through. In the morning he quickly ran through the screening program and told me that we would only have 15 mins per player so it was going to be tight (I was thinking oh my god I hope I can keep up) . So the things we were looking at were(some were extras that needed to be covered for his data collection for his PHd pilot study): Scapula position at rest, elbow carrying angle, combined elevation, shoulder internal/external rotation, straight leg raise, hip rotation ROM, Sit and Reach and Knee to wall angle and distance. Steve wanted to know if any of the previous limitations predisposed players to certain injuries or arm pain.

The most common injuries seen in cricket are: Lower back pain, Side strain, Posterior ankle impingement, hamstring strains, lower limb tendinopathy and throwing related shoulder pain. From unpublished data Steve suggested that some of predisposing factors for injuries were.

  • Throwing arm pain- elbow : Reduced¬†total ROM Gleno-humeral Joint and External Rotation on dominant side, reduced Combined elevation, reduced grip strength as a % of Body weight,¬†strength shoulder internal and external rotn, back extension, calf raises.
  • General LBP:¬†Reduced Back Extension and Side Plank times, L to R imbalance on Side plank, reduced Add Squeeze (Look up muscle slings that act on the pelvis to understand reduced adductor squeeze.)
  • LBP fast bowlers‚ÄďSimilar trunk muscle endurance scores but difference not as great, decreased Combined elevation, Dorsiflexion and Sit and Reach.
  • Posterior Ankle impingement:¬†Reduced Dorsiflexion Rom and > L and R difference

So these were some of the reasons we were screening the players so we can look back in retrospective to see whether these limitations are the cause of problem and so players can be given appropriate management plans. Steve has been working in Cricket for about 9 Years so he was really knowledgeable of his sport. You become to realise that each physio at the top has their own ideas and clinical reasoning. At west brom there is a strict focus on prehabilitation, whereas England cricket would focus on physical Preparation. So I think when you get into the area you want to work in you have to ensure you make decisions about how you manage your players/ patients using your own clinical reasoning and judgement, whilst basing practice on evidence. I really enjoyed the first day of the camp because Steve took the time to explain his reasoning and provided some teaching on the Shoulder complex.

On the second day a lot of the drills in the morning were focused on batting, fielding and throwing. Each player was filmed using high speed cameras so their  technique and biomechanics could be recorded. Cricket is not necessarily a sport I follow but it was good to see a break down of skills and to see the difference between the spinners and fast bowlers. I was manning one of the cameras for the batting so I got a real close up of the players. In the afternoon most of our screening was based on muscle endurance so we were looking at Back extension, side planks, calf raises, bridges whilst the strength and conditioning coaches  also carried out other functional movement and strength tests. Again we were looking at imbalances and factors which may predispose players to injury. It was great to see that the physios and strength and conditioning coaches working closely together off the same page as I believe there is a real gap in everyday practice between health professionals and the fitness industry.

So what is in the pipe line for me now, well I am attending the CSP West Midlands Regional Network Meeting on Monday to see what is happening in the region. Regional network meetings are great for networking with qualified clinicians and most are very welcoming to students and new grads. Visit your individual region on the CSP website to see when their next meeting is.

http://www.csp.org.uk/nations-regions

After having so much backing for my blog there is a potential it will be promoted on the CSP website in the blog section so watch this space.

See some pictures below from the ECB Profiling Camp:

IMG_0588  IMG_0590 IMG_0589IMG_0587IMG_0591

Thanks for taking an interest in my blog, if you have any comments please feel free to leave them on this page or tweet me @LC_physio.