Are you going to be the solution or the problem?

This blog has taken me a while to write because there has been so many fantastic accounts by Physiotherapy Students and Physiotherapists alike. Here are a few links below apologies if I have forgotten any.

https://aphysiostudent.wordpress.com/2015/02/10/student-rep-development-weekend-2015/

https://cuspblogs.wordpress.com/2015/02/10/having-a-voice-and-making-a-difference/

http://liamdoylestudentphysio.blogspot.co.uk/

http://www.csp.org.uk/blog/2015/02/12/physiotherapy-students-are-already-leaders-innovators

Lucy Cocker

It was at the back end of the year when I was asked to give a presentation, from a graduates perspective as part of the Physio works programme. The theme of the event stemmed from making a case for change. The event challenged the status quo and asked students to step outside the box and ask the question where will the future of Physiotherapy go? And where do we fit?

My talk gave a personal account of my journey and hopefully planted a seed to enable students to push the boundaries of their personal development. I really wanted students to think about doing things differently and not just going through the motions of student life.

“If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got.“

– Henry Ford (1863-1947), American founder of the Ford Motor Company

Lessons I have learnt along the way

  • Network, Network, Network! -Many of my previous experiences have come about through networking  and have got me where I am today so keep in contact with people you meet.
  • Karen Middleton: “Learn to live with a bit of mess”-Prioritisation is a key skill to develop sometimes some of the things you do don’t need to be perfect to get the job done but it is important to prioritise the things that really do need to be perfect.
  • Learn to say no-You are only one person and you can’t do it all without sending yourself into melt down so learn to delegate.
  • Interviews are a skill- Don’t worry if you struggle in your first few interviews they are a skill to develop which you may read through my blog.
  • Don’t forget about your degree- This links back to prioritisation your degree should be a priority and then work in opportunities around it.
  • Look at challenges as opportunities-There are many things i have done which I have thought I’m not sure about this but at the end of the day you don’t know until you try and if it doesn’t work what have you lost?
  • Take a positive attitude everywhere you go-You will sometimes hit problems along the way with university, placements, jobs. Take a backwards step and look at the problem holistically what can you influence and break the problem down into small chunks.

Thinking outside the right box.

  • When you are faced with barriers you need to find a route around them.
  • What are you trying to achieve? Is the thing you are doing going to provide a solution?
  • Don’t do something because it will look good on your CV.
  • “Take a chance don’t make a plan” Emma Stokes.

The event was fantastic as always and I learnt a lot from the student reps as well as the key speakers. The main thing I took away was during Karen’s and Ieuan’s talk on influencing. If you want to influence someone you need to work out what makes them tick but not only that you need to go with solutions not problems. I want to take this opportunity to thank the CSP students for inviting me to the event and I look forward to see where your journeys take you!

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Physiotherapy Works-providing evidence for solutions to problems.


So on a different note I am also going to share with you the report from the Industrial Relations Committee. I sit on this committee as a newly qualified physiotherapist and it has really been an eye opener to the campaigns and background work done by the CSP and ERUS. Below is my interpretation adapted from the key messages provided by Claire Sullivan.

Committee membership: The committee co-opted two new members; Stephanie Heasley for Northern Ireland and Chris Manning for Higher Education

TTIP: Owen Tudor, Head of European Union and international relations at the TUC, joined the meeting to give a presentation on TTIP (the transatlantic trade and investment partnership) and in particular its implications for the healthcare sector. Owen identified 3 things that CSP members could do on this issue:

  • Lobby your local MP and MEP on the issue and specifically on the need for the health sector to be excluded
  • Ensure that the CSP does the same with the relevant Secretaries of State and Shadow Secretaries
  • Raise awareness of the proposals with friends and family

TTIP is a very complex concept but in basic terms on how TTIP could affect us:

  • Investor state dispute settlement could allow for individual companies to take state/government to independent tribunal where they can sue for compensation. This is only open to foreign investors (which is an unreasonable power grab on global organisations). For example if there was a breach of expected profits from a future contract eg a private foreign company could take Government to a tribunal if an NHS contract breached the expected profit.
  • Public Service-Public services are normally protected from Free Trade Agreements, However, because the NHS is now, in part, provided by commercial companies, it will only be protected from TTIP if it is explicitly excluded from the treaty (which currently it is not).
  • Health and Safety at work under this agreement would be affected. ISDS will give any US company operating in the UK health market the right to sue the government if it introduces new public health regulation, or health protection and health promotion policy measures that might affect these companies’ future investment or profit opportunities. So evidence for safer or more effective treatments, or advances in clinical knowledge, could not be put into practice (at least without the risk of being sued) if this affected the anticipated profits of existing providers. At the same time, harmonisation of health and safety regulations is likely to mean the downgrading of UK public health measures governing the use of food labeling, pesticides, chemicals, the presence of hormones in meat production and so on.
  • We still don’t know what is in TTIP yet and there is a presumption of secrecy (we won’t like what they are offering).
  • More info can be found here: http://www.patients4nhs.org.uk/eu-us-free-trade-agreement-or-ttip/
  • https://secure.38degrees.org.uk/pages/ttip_home

Vision for UK Physiotherapy: the committee received a presentation and video on the draft ‘Vision for UK Physiotherapy’ which had been developed and seen by Council members in December. The agreed overall statement is ‘Transforming Lives, Maximising Independence, Empowering Populations.

NHS Pay in England: the revised pay offer for 2015-16 was considered by the committee. It was agreed that members would be consulted on the offer through stewards, with a recommendation to accept on the basis that the offer is the best that can achieved through negotiation (as there was no commitment to industrial action from members). Committee members acknowledged that the new offer is worse for a proportion of higher paid CSP members but noted that nonetheless it is significantly better for the large majority.

Workforce planning: members and managers are reporting significant difficulties in recruiting at both Band 5 and Band 6. Further examples of this should be fed in to Kate Moran at the CSP. I can forward this on if needs be.

Reports from the Countries: the committee considered updates from Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England. In particular it was noted the substantial difficulties still being faced my members working in, or trying to obtain work in, Northern Ireland.

‘Freedom to Speak Up’ Review: the report into Robert Francis review into whistleblowing in the NHS will be published in 11 Feb and can be accessed athttps://freedomtospeakup.org.uk/

Members working outside the NHS: CSP SNO Neil Lark updated the committee on a range of issues affecting members working outside the NHS, including in higher education, the Ministry of Defence, in companies including Nuffield Healthcare and Spire and in social enterprises.

TUC Women’s Conference: this year’s delegation of members attending Womens’ TUC was ratified by the committee. The members are Kim Gainsborough, regional steward in the east of England, Gwawr Jonas, a steward in Wales and Louise Wright, regional steward in Wales.

October 18 ‘Britain needs a pay rise’ demonstration: the committee reviewed the attendance at the events in London, Glasgow and Belfast and thanked everyone who came along. The committee agreed that for any future similar events, encouragement to attend would start with CSP core activists and others who had previously expressed an interest in the relevant area.

ERUS workplan: the committee considered the progress that had been made in 2014 towards key objectives and also reviewed the draft workplan for 2015. The committee was supportive of a more streamlined version focussing on the two key priorities of ‘organising’ and ‘negotiating’.

Future meetings: priorities for the next meeting were identified and included:

  • Recruitment difficulties
  • Feedback from the workforce data modelling and safe and effective staffing levels projects
  • Post General Election wash-up
  • Inviting an outside speaker to talk about fair taxation

Thank you for taking an interest in my blog, I have been overwhelmed with positive comments which continues to drive me to write more. As always if you have any questions or comments leave a post on here or tweet me @LCphysio

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#Physio14: Where will the next 100 years take us?

This post has been slightly delayed partly due to me gallivanting in Vietnam for 2 weeks but also due to my change in shift pattern on Trauma and Orthopaedics I have less time in the evenings to sit and write my blog. This post will mainly cover my trip to Physiotherapy UK and will touch on future exciting developments in the pipe line.

Attending Physiotherapy UK was a relatively last minute decision. I had been to the conference for the last 5 or so years as a student and newly qualified, however this year with me going to Vietnam for a couple of weeks I was definitely counting my pennies.

I can tell you the decision not to go did not last long as everyone kept messaging me  asking “Are you going to Physio UK?” and in the end I just didn’t want to miss out! It was a great 2 day event which was credit to the organisers  and council, a truly inspiring event with lots of learning to take away. I have written this blog  in blocks so you can skip to the presentation summary you want,( I have not included all of the presentations as I would be here all night). Each one will be divided by a horizontal line.

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Rob Webster- Meeting the 201 Challenge: Opportunity and Threat. NHS Confederation.

It was great for Rob Webster, Chief Executive of NHS Confederation, to come and deliver a talk at Physio UK. Rob really did set the scene for the challenges faced by the NHS in the near future and where Physiotherapy can play its part.

So the current Challenges:

  • Generational Challenge- A society becoming dependent on the health service.
  • Ageing Population- An increasing demand on the Health service.
  • NHS Reform
  • Funding Cuts
  • A population with multiple issues.

We have a leadership role to be optimistic: 7 Themes the NHS needs to address.

  1. The Need challenge-changing population
  2. The Culture challenge
  3. The Design Challenge
  4. The Finance Challenge
  5. The Leadership Challenge
  6. The Workforce Challenge
  7. The Technology Challenge.

So we need ambition for the future- Where is the NHS going?

The vision and asks: The 2015 Challenge Manifesto a time for action.

  • Start with Prevention
  • Long Term Conditions- supported self care
  • Seven day services- local hospitals
  • Hyper acute trusts to save your life in need.

Things we need to remember as Physiotherapists and other Health Professionals.

  • We are guests in other peoples lives. We need to put ourselves in our patients’ shoes to truly understand what they are going through.
  • Our outcomes should be theirs.
  • We should organise around them and not our professional egos.

The Opportunities.

  • Integration working as one team across community and across organisations
  • Cost effective- using and promoting the work being done by Physio Works.
  • Right Person, Right Care.

Threats

  • Misunderstood Role- we need to learn to shout a bit louder about our profession.
  • The Heft of Status Quo.- “If you always do what you have always done you will always get what you have always got”
  • Visibility- Do commissioners know what we can do?
  • Unintended consequences of safe staffing
  • Plurality.

My take home message: We are facing a challenging environment within NHS whether it be cuts, increasing pressure to meet demands or trying to make Physiotherapy heard. We could easily just sit on our laurels and wait for someone to make a plan for us however we all have a responsibility to push our profession forwards and demonstrate how we can be a major part of the transformation of the NHS.


Centenary Founders Lecture 1912-2014 Karen Middleton.

I think I must have done 3 blog posts including a speech from Karen but each time I take away something different. The lecture was focused on how Physiotherapy has transformed over the last 100 years. How we take for granted our Autonomy and need to look back at how our founders over came the challenges to achieve this. Physiotherapy has a great future if we continue to push the boundaries of our profession.

Karen’s Leadership Lessons.

  1. Take Responsibility for your own development- I have taken this forwards by finding a mentor to guide my development.
  2. Things that Karen reflects on: What are you known for? What do you want to be known for? What challenges you? What have you learnt? What have you recently added to your CV? Why should anyone be lead by you?
  3. We need to be flexible! Learn to live with a bit of mess!
  4. What level of risk can you accept? What can you get away with?
  5. Learn to act quickly but not rashly. Don’t over think.
  6. Leadership takes guts
  7. Speak out when others are silent when integrity is at stake. Would you stand up for Physiotherapy?
  8. Everything in your body will tell you you can’t do it. Imposter syndrome we diminish our own value.
  9. We must be authentic
  10. People need a reason to follow you. People need to feel empowered.

If you want to see the video to Karen’s inspirational lecture please click the link below.

http://www.csp.org.uk/news/2014/10/10/karen-middleton-calls-action-stop-physiotherapy-sleepwalking-obscurity


Supporting People with Long Term Conditions- Prof Ann Ashburn

Patients need:

  • Support, Information, choice- patient preference, self-management, Information about their condition, prevention+ health promotion, psycho-social, point of contact when things go wrong, feedback from patients for service improvement and Training for all.

The Strengths of Physiotherapy

  • Active participants
  • Targets set and agreed
  • Collaboration
  • People views of Physiotherapists.

Challenges

  • Limited Research
  • Psycho-social aspect
  • Leisure activities- health promotion
  • Utilising Technology

Disempowerment and Psycho-social factors in long term conditions

  • Attention
  • Diminished concentration affects learning
  • Not being given enough time to think
  • Too many instructions
  • Background noise
  • Fatigue
  • Day to day variability, medication cycle & sleeping patterns. Affected by dehydration (as a result of slowness to swallow,concern about bladder control) so could have headaches, fatigue, constipation all of which will affect performance.
  •  Answering phone – better face to face

Empowerment

  • Allow patients to achieve
  • Recognition of previous life and the patient as a person
  • Choice
  • Support

The final part of Ann’s presentation looked at some of the health promotion activities that Physiotherapists could be involved in such as a scheme called Life after Parkinson’s. For example they set up a dance group for patients with PD . This was just one example of how we need to be creative to improve patient experience and that there is life after a diagnosis of a long term condition.


Assessment and Treatment Planning for MS- Dr Jenny Freeman

Symptoms of MS

  • Fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Poor Coordination
  • Spasticity
  • Sensory Disturbance
  • Visual Disturbance
  • Poor Swallow
  • Bladder and Bowel etc

Some questions and top tips for people with MS.

What are you currently doing to manage your health? What exercise?

Is there anything putting you off?

Do you ever Fall? Impaired  balance during Transfers, STS, Turning./Delayed motor response/Alteration of 2 sensory inputs/use of walking aids.

Exercise is proven to be beneficial and is not associated with relapse. Transient symptoms should settle down.

Should be aiming to complete Resistance training 2-3/week at mod intensity 60-80% 1rep max 1-3sets for min 8 weeks. Aerobic training 2-3 times a week 30 mins 4x a week.

Some of the balance interventions: Increase sway in quiet stance, delayed anticipatory + autonomic postural adjustments. Evidence suggests the benefits for balance interventions.

Current Outcome Measures Used.

10m Timed Walk, Single leg stance, lateral reach, confidence scale ABC, MS Walking scale, Activities specific MS, Grip strength, 9 hole peg test.

Useful Resources: Rehabilitation Measures Database- Neurology/ MS edge outcome measures database.


Measuring Respiratory Symptoms in Advanced MS? What’s the point? What’s the evidence? What are the options? by Rachel Moses.

This was a regular problem when I was working on an acute respiratory ward, MS patients being picked up too late for respiratory Ax. If these patients are caught early there are many interventions which can be taught to prevent admission to hospital but the new NICE guideline for MS have removed speech/swallow and respiratory management from the guidelines even though anecdotal evidence suggests there is a need.

MS pulmonary dysfunction and function 

  • Marked expiratory dysfunction – poor cough
  • Severe diaphragm weakness ? Indication or higher cervical cord lesion.
  • Limited ability to maximally exhale
  • reduced vital capacity for patients who desaturate over night.
  • MS- abnormalities in breathing control, resp muscle weakness, bulbar dysfunction.

What’s the Point?

So when we are assessing a patient we want to be looking at their peak cough flow. If the patients peak cough flow falls below 270ml then it is likely they will need some support to have an effective cough.

  • Lung Volume recruitment bags would be the first port of call this aids breath stacking to increase lung volume for a more effective cough.
  • If LVR isn’t enough some patients may need a Manual assisted cough as well.
  • The final port of call would be manual Insufflation: Exsufflation. This is a machine which delivers a volume and then switches the pressure release the volume and augment a cough. MI:E has been shown to be a cost effective admission avoidance strategy for patients with advanced NMD.

From this presentation it reiterated the importance of early respiratory assessment to prevent acute admissions. It also highlighted a need to educate commissioners on the benefit of respiratory management for patients with MS.


The Dementia Challenge- Iain Lang

What is Dementia?

  • A set of symptoms, progressive condition.
  • Not easy to differentiate between different types of dementia
  • variable condition day to day.

Why is dementia important?

  • Common
  • It’s frightening- most feared health condition, reliance on others
  • £26 billion cost to UK Economy
  • people with dementia stay an average five days longer in hospital.

How can we respond to the challenge?

  • Diagnosis more than 1/2 of people with dementia are not diagnosed.
  • Treatment- drugs are used to reduce symptoms and deal with psychosis, anxiety or depression. No current drug developments.
  • Understand how to communicate with patients with dementia- now mandatory training.
  1. Prevention- managing other commorbidities  HTN, Diabetes.
  2. Don’t smoke this increases the risk of dementia
  3. Eat a Mediterranean diet
  4. stay engaged prevent social isolation, learn new things
  5. Exercise best evidence to prevent dementia

Implicit memory- how you do things?

  • Evidence suggests the way forwards
  • error less learning
  • positive experience
  • repetition guiding what you want.

Implicit vs Explicit

  • Priming
  • errorless learning
  • repeated constant practice
  •  avoid multitasking

Dual Tasking

  • Capactiy overaload
  • Structural interface- sensory overload- for example during standing use fingers instead of hands to support patient.
  • be patient
  • don’t overload senses
  • one thing at a time
  • may choose to do this as part of rehab.

Communication

  • Dementia questionnaire inpatient- what do they enjoy?
  • Smile
  • Understand where people come from.

Pain

  • Very overlooked
  • most unable to verbalise
  • unable to process pain
  • unable to identify pain
  • unable to understand why they are in pain
  • What were they taking before?
  • Pain scale- Abbey pain scale.

People with dementia should be given the opportunity to maximise their potential.

  • Approach from the front good eye contact
  • think about what they are called
  • short commands and being courteous
  • keep hand movements open
  • use positive tone
  • goal based- lets go and look out the window
  • stand up tall
  • use gesture or tap where
  • avoid jargon
  • use of equipment be aware may not understand how to use.

I have been able to take this learning into practice in the acute setting by adapting my communication and limiting sensory bombardment, in turn I have found my patients with dementia have made good progress. Sometimes you need to be patient and try and build rapport  before asking them to do something but if you can get them on your side you will make your job a lot easier. I have also found that by reducing my handling has encouraged patients to be more active during the treatment session which has limited the manual handling load for me.


So that was just a review of some of the presentations I attended whilst at Physio UK. During the event I was able to catch up and network with many different people who I aim to stay in contact with. Physio UK always offers a great opportunity to speak to new people who share a similar interest to you whether that be Management, Education, MSK, Respiratory, Neurology and more. Whilst at the drinks reception I got talking to Paula Manning, outgoing Vice Chair East Midlands Regional network and Catherine Pope, Vice Chair of council. They asked me whether I would be prepared to stand as Vice Chair for the East Midlands Network. I was ecstatic to have been asked but I suggested that I would need to confirm this with my manager. My manager has now agreed to support me and I have been selected to run as Vice Chair of EMRN. The role will be a challenge but it will give me valuable experience which can be transferable to my professional developent. I have lots of people to support me so I am looking forward to taking the role forwards into 2015.

One final thing in the pipe line, I have been asked by the CSP student reps to speak at the annual rep development weekend.  I am really looking forward to sharing my experience as a new graduate with reps and hopefully inspiring them to do great things and take the future of our profession forwards.

Apologies for the length of this blog, but Thank you for taking an interest. Wishing everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy 2015! Any comments or questions please leave a message below or tweet me @LCphysio.

This time last Year!

How crazy around this time last year I was starting to write my blog. Now a year qualified looking through my posts it is crazy to think how much I have achieved in that time. So this blog post is going to update people on my progress through rotations and will also touch on a recent course I have been on for Strength and Conditioning combined with Physiotherapy.

Currently I am working within the Specialist Medicine team at Derby, covering one of the acute respiratory wards and the High Dependency Unit. My first impression of starting my respiratory rotation was although respiratory physiotherapy isn’t my comfort zone, it was a skill I needed to develop. I naively thought “well at least I won’t have the same level of social sort out as elderly medicine….” (How wrong I was). You forget that elderly people may also have a respiratory condition and even if they are not elderly you may have to deal with breathlessness management, oxygen requirements and anxiety to prevent people being readmitted to hospital. Initially I found myself being very slow with my assessment an acute ward is very different from ITU. On ITU a lot of the patients did not necessarily have predisposing respiratory conditions (not all of them) or they were intubated so management was focused on chest clearance and early rehab. Whereas on an acute ward you are looking at how patients will manage at home with ADL’s, the need for long term oxygen therapy, occupational therapy involvement and  the need for social services involement. On the ward we work closely with the OT, one of the things we look at is equipment to help with energy conservation, as this can help to maintain a patients’ independence.

On the ward we have around 28 beds including a 4 bed High Dependency Unit. The high dependency unit has 1 nurse for 2 beds and is mainly for patients who are needing Acute NIV, Tracheotomies who need regular management, patients who have the ability to deteriorate who need escalation to ITU and patients who have reached there ceiling of care on HDU (so they are not for escalation to ITU if they deteriorate likely because their respiratory function is limited due to predisposing lung condition). The sort of patients I have been exposed to on HDU are Spinal cord injuries, Stroke, Neuro-muscular conditions such as GBS , acute exacerbation of COPD, vasculitis and severe pneumonia (So a range of conditions to get stuck into). In HDU all the patients have the ability to go off quickly so you have to keep your eye on the ball, however, it is worth noting that not all of the patients in HDU need physio. For example the patients dependent on NIV who do not have sputum retention normally just need time for their blood gases to normalise so we would hold off unless they need us for mobility Ax.

So objectives I have set myself on Respiratory:

1. To be able to carry out a Subjective and Objective Assessment on a:  i)Critically unwell patient ii)Ward Based patient iii) create a problem list and Rx plan.

2. To be confident using different Rx techniques and demonstrating clinical reasoning. i) Mechanical devices ii) Manual techniques iii) Suction iv) Advice and Education v) Postural Drainage.

3. To be confident in interpreting observations i) HDU charts ii) Auscultation iii) ABG’s

4. Prioritisation of a respiratory ward. i) HDU II) Ward Management iii) Discharge planning.

5. To be on call competent and safe

Through this rotation I will spend half of my time on the ward with HDU and half of my time on a general respiratory ward. To become on call competent through supervision sessions I am slowly working through my competencies. So far I have been fortunate for the experiences I have gained which will set me up for going on call.  However, I don’t think you can ever be prepared for the adrenaline kick of an on call situation. I think the best advice I have been given is always to go back to basics and question why someone has ended up in the situation they are in. What can we have an effect on? And what can’t we have an effect on? What is the main problem: Lung volume, Sputum or work of breathing or both? (This is how I would look at my patients but obviously everyone has different methods you would also complete a thorough respiratory assessment to reach your conclusion).

So slowly but surely my confidence with respiratory is slowly increasing and I am hoping to be ready for the September rota eeeek!! I will try to keep you updated with my progress.

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So very much away from respiratory physiotherapy. I recently attended a course: The Integration of Strength & Conditioning and Athletic Screening to the Management of the Sporting Client: Recreational to Elite Level. The course was run by Harborne Physio and was taken by Simon Noad (West Brom Physiotherapist) and Ray Jackman (S+C coach based on Uni of Birmingham). I wanted to attend this course because there is a known gap between physio and S+C. We should be working in partnership to help athletes or clients achieve their goals. So I wanted to gain a bit more knowledge of S+C and how this would fit into my practice. Just to say people may have differing opinions regarding this process this is just one example. How I have written this up may be a bit jumpy because I have jumped through different principles discussed on the course.

The course was fantastic and it is the first combined S+C/ Physio course in the UK. Simon and Ray were great teachers and explained the principles and practical elements very clearly. The course highlighted that we should be focusing on training athletes not specific “Footballers, rugby players or runners”. The process of S+C is to help develop an individual to perform at the best of their ability.Obviously you will reach a point where you need to be looking at sport specific requirements but we must create foundations first. Is the athlete fit to undertake a training regime without breaking down. There are many elements which must be incorporated into a training regime to account for this for example: Nutrition, Speed, Strength, Power, Recovery,RSA, Endurance, Injury prevention, Flexibility, Anaerobic, Research. If we just breakdown recovery we should be looking at: Sleep (10 hours for an athlete), Hydration, Nutrition, Foam rolling, Mobility work, compression, ?Ice Baths so all of the elements can be deconstructed to create a comprehensive Ax and Plan.

So back to athletic profiling things to consider?

1: When do we screen:Pre season, End of season, following significant injury, return to training or objective Ax. There is no right or wrong answer.

2. Where?: Where do you work, what are you trying to measure?

3. How?: Single station, multi-station, single practitioner or multiple, number of athletes.

After devising a plan we should be doing a medical screen, if you do not have  medical support. This may highlight risks such as Cardiac problems which may need to be screened. http://www.c-r-y.org.uk/ . If in doubt refer to a Doctor or advise client to seek GP advice. (No your scope of practice).

The Screen

Habits/ Daily activities- may lead to motor control restrictions. This links to Poor training regimes which may cause soft tissue restrictions and finally previous injuries which may lead to movement dysfunctions linking back to habits.

How we are born to squat

Some of the things we may include in a initial screen are a Squat, Lunge, Single leg dip, box drop, forward hop and a combination. We should be marking these against normal movement to pre-empt restrictions and weakness. The testing must be standardised and you don’t have to include all of the movements to get what you want (look at the specifics of the sport).

Then we would move onto NMSK assessment some of the tings you might look at. (Not an extensive list)

  • Spinal position
  • Spinal AROM
  • Ankle ROM
  • SIJ mobility
  • Prone internal rotation
  • Thoracic Spine AROM
  • Hamstring AROM
  • ITB length
  • Hip flexor lengthon
  • Groin Strength
  • Quadriceps length
  • Hyper mobility
  • Motor/Core Control- looking at timing of muscle activation

There was a lot of practical elements looking at exercise prescription and how you would take your data forwards into a profile. The process I will incorporate into my practice will look at:

  1. Mobility
  2. Motor Control
  3. Functional Patterning.

We can incorporate this method into practice to formulate a comprehensive treatment or exercise prescription. It is difficult to demonstrate this in a blog post but basically the rational for this is because quality stability is driven by quality proprioception. And Quality functional movements cannot occur with restriction. So we should be addressing restrictions in RX, fire up the NMSK system and then consolidate learning with functional patterning.

For mobility we should be addressing myofascial length and Joint Range this links back to muscle slings which may impact of an athletes training. I am not going to go through the different slings and predisposition to different injuries as I will be here all day but some good examples can be found here: http://www.mobilitywod.com/#[/

or in the book “How to become a Supple Leopard”

After Mobility we can address motor control which is looking at stabilisation working in the new range of movement you have achieved. Some of the things which may be included are: Rolling, Dead lifting and chop and lift. This element demonstrates perfectly how much of MSK physio can relate to Neuro physio.

Finally we look at motor patterning using new control and range and incorporating them into functional movements. Something people might want to read around is Reactive Neuromuscular Training.

Your client should now be ready for S+C training however the whole process falls under the broad umbrella of S+C so there are links between the two, highlighting the need for more integration and a holistic approach.

The second part of the course focused very much on the principles of S+C incorporating RAMP principles into training. Work by Ian Jeffery’s comes into this. Elements we should be including within S+C are :

  • Needs Analysis: Requirements of the sport, movement Ax and Physiological Ax.
  • Warm Up: Raise- Increase HR etc, Activate- key muscle groups, Mobilise- look at movements not muscles and  Potentiate- sport specific drills.
  • Have an understanding of SPORT and FITT principles (not just giving 3x sets of 10)

So this was just a whistle stop tour of the course and this blog is not an exhaustive program of what you would consider but may give you some prompts to look at different elements of your practice. The main learning points I took away from the course are:

  1. When, Where and How to conduct an athletic screen and profile.
  2. The importance of looking at Mobility>>Motor Control >> Functional Patterning
  3. RAMP principles
  4. The importance of specific and tailored training regimes.
  5. The importance of understanding the needs of your athlete.

Thank you for taking an interest in my blog.  Next week I will be attending the CSP industrial relations committee meeting at CSP head quarters so my next blog is likely to be centred around that.

If you have any comments please post to my wall or tweet me @LCphysio

Painting my Future Plan!

It appears I have been absent for a month or so from the blogging scene, so it is nice to finally have chance to sit and write a new post. On my last post I was just starting my new permanent rotational band 5  job in Derby. Taking on a new job is an exciting and scary time and I did wonder whether I had made the right decision….will I slot  into the teams, will I enjoy the rotations, how will I cope with a bigger commute and will I drive myself mad living back at home with my parents? All I can say is so far this post and my current situation has been far from a disappointment. We make our own luck and certainly everything appears to be falling into place.

So where to start…. My first rotation is on elderly medicine which is due to finish at the end of April to move to respiratory medicine and on call training (eeeeek!). I have felt so welcomed within the teams at Derby Hospital and they have really been pushing my personal development and quality of care for patients. I have now begun the Preceptorship process and regularly meet with my supervisor to plan and take action on future aims and objectives. My objectives on this rotation aim to cover 4 tasks set by the preceptorship programme (which a scheme to create a seamless transition from Student to Band 5 physiotherapist minus the 6 month incremental pay!).

Task 1: Working with Patients and Groups. 3,2,1.

Task 2: Working with Colleagues and Other agencies. 2,4.

Task 3: Written Communication 2,3.

Task 4: Using local Clinical Policies relating to working practice. – Identifying risk and creating a follow up plan. Carrying out a notes Audit.

The numbers following each task, cross reference to my objectives which I will use as evidence for each task.

My Objectives 06/01/2014- 22/04/2014.

1. i) To be able to identify appropriate patient’s for humidified Oxygen. ii) To be able to set up a humidified oxygen circuit independently.

2. i) To be able to explain the range of rehab options for any given patient. ii) Identify the most appropriate referral. iii) To be able to complete a timely referral.

3. i) To complete a comprehensive + patient specific new  Ax. i) To create a specific and comprehensive problem list. ii) Treatment Plan. iii) Smart Goals.

4. To lead case load management on ward, delegating to BS/ PTA’s and other qualified members of staff.

5. Present an in-service training session for the therapy team.

NB: How I will evidence this is recorded in my Portfolio.

This just gives you an idea of the sort of things I am looking at as a Band 5 physiotherapist. I plan to update my progress post rotation…. What I would do differently? Are there any other objectives I should be including? What went well? And what am I hoping for in my next rotation?

Since starting at Derby I have been given the  opportunity  to continue my work for the CSP as I been selected to sit on the Industrial Relations Committee as the Newly Qualified Rep.

The Industrial Relations Committee (IRC) have special responsibilities in relation to decisions on Pay, Terms and Conditions. Members of the IRC have Leadership and Governance roles to support CSP members.  This may involve inspiring, engaging and empowering members in relation to the work of the IRC and wider trade union issues and campaigns.

In brief the IRC aims to consider all matters and develop policies and strategies, relating to salaries, employment, labour utilisation and conditions of service for Chartered Physiotherapists, Associates and other persons represented by the Society.

I am trying to find the best way to keep in touch with Newly Qualified physiotherapists to put their view across. I have posted a link on iCSP

http://www.csp.org.uk/icsp/topics/calling-all-newly-qualified-physiotherapists?networkid=226045

to see if this generates some interest. I would like New grads to come forward with any issues affecting them in the work place (NHS or Non NHS), which they feel needs to be taken further than Steward and H&S rep level. Local issues can normally be resolved through Stewards and H&S reps. However, if a problem is of a national scale or you feel other New Grads may be facing a similar situation please get in touch.

KEY COMMUNICATIONS MESSAGES- IRC MEETING 5TH FEBRUARY 2014 

New IRC Chair – Jill Barker elected as new IRC Chair.  IRC paid warm tribute to outgoing chair Alex MacKenzie.

Wider Environment – Important to track what’s happening in the wider economy.  Changes to benefits, public services, living standards etc. All impact on profession and patients.

Lobbying Bill – now passed by Parliament.  Strenuous campaigning secured some improvements, but still a big step backwards in terms of democratic rights. CSP to assess how best to mitigate the impact on our ability to lobby and campaign on behalf of members.

NHS Pay, Pensions & Conditions

  •  Pay Review Body (PRB) recommendations on this year’s pay lift, and the Government response, now expected in March. Also likely to be big challenges ahead, issues such as incremental progression.
  • Changes to Agenda for Change terms and conditions in Wales to go out to member consultation once position re doctors clarified.  While not welcome, they represent a significant shift from those originally proposed.
  • First report of joint employer/union working group on implications of staff working longer due out next week. CSP represented on the group.
  • Discussions taking place on very difficult issues around the future funding of the NHS and other public sector pension schemes.  Widening access to the NHS scheme for non-NHS members delivering NHS services represents a concrete success

NHS Social Partnership Working – CSP now has a seat ‘at the table’ in all 4 countries, giving access to information and key decision makers

Competition – new cross-CSP group to be set up to steer CSP’s future work on competition, including learning lessons from early initiatives.  Outcome of current negotiations on an EU-US trade treaty could have big impact.  TUC lobbying making some headway in ensuring public consultation on treaty takes place.

Safe Staffing Levels – CSP employment and professional functions working together on key issues for profession raised by the Francis report, in particular guidance for members on safe and effective staffing levels and the duty of candour.

TUC ‘For a Future that Works’ campaign – IRC agreed to support next major national demonstration planned for October, and to encourage maximum member participation.  Also to support the new Robin Hood Tax petition and video.  Aim of both initiatives is to present the practical alternatives to austerity. Rally’s are a way of organisations/unions showing solidarity on a campaign.

http://www.tuc.org.uk/about-tuc/britain-needs-pay-rise-%E2%80%93-tuc-mass-demonstration-autumn

http://www.csp.org.uk/professional-union/union-support/future-works

Organising – formal CSP recognition secured at the Percy Hedley Foundation in the North East. Welcome precedent.  New briefing on CSP employment services for members working outside the NHS in preparation.

NB This is only a snapshot of the meeting and the comprehensive range of papers tabled.

The weekend after the meeting I was also fortunate to be invited to the Student Rep Development Weekend (which I attended as a student CSP rep). It was strange being on the other side but this years Student Executive Committee have done a great job ensuring the student voice remains . There were many great speakers from the conference which generated a lot of interest on twitter! The transcript for the event can be found here:

http://hashtags.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtag-transcript.php?hashtag=SRDW14&fdate=02-06-2014&shour=0&smin=0&tdate=02-09-2014&thour=23&tmin=43&ssec=00&tsec=00&img=1&page=2&page=1

And Analytics here:

http://www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/SRDW14/analytics/?hashtag=SRDW14&fdate=02%2F06%2F2014&shour=0&smin=0&tdate=02%2F09%2F2014&thour=23&tmin=43&ssec=00&tsec=00&img=1

If I was to talk about all of the speakers from the weekend you would be here reading all night ! Ella a student physio summarises and reflects on the weekend very well ( a great blog from a student physio)

http://aphysiostudent.wordpress.com/2014/02/09/student-rep-development-weekend-2014/comment-page-1/#comment-4

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The key points I took away from the weekend in bullet form:

  • If you want something go after it! Don’t wait for something to happen, go make it happen. Simon Shepherd brought this to life talking about his life story.
  • Some very interesting links from Simon Shepherds talk: http://www.firstbeat.com/ http://www.firstbeat.com/work-well-being/investing-in-well-being-pays-off#Individual
  • “Take a chance, don’t make a plan”, following Karen Middleton’s interview on her career from Student to Chief Executive, it highlighted that we should be flexible in our career path and grasp opportunities made available to us. She talked about pushing the boundaries of her work by working out of her comfort zone. She demonstrated the ability to develop coping strategies whatever she turned her hand to. (Note this is my interpretation of the interview).
  • Aspire to be the best you can be. Set yourself Goals and write a mission statement.
  • Network, Network, Network a useful place to start in Linked IN or Twitter. Networking can open many opportunities start now.
  • Remember you are upholding your profession on Social Media Platforms. Mitigate the risks and engage!
  • Learn about power poses! http://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are.html how can you implement this into practice?

I always come away from each Student Rep Development weekend feeling truely inspired by leaders of the profession, the speakers and the energy from the student reps. Physiotherapy is such a dynamic profession and the more I put in the more I get out.

My action points following the development weekend are:

  • To learn more about motivational interviewing and power poses.
  • To write a personal development plan for the next 5-10 years (as a guide)
  • To find a mentor to help me to refine my leadership skills.

Below are a few photos from the event.

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And so all I have left to do now is to write my Mission Statement:

“I will always strive to achieve excellence in my work and life. I will continue to help others and guide them to opportunities within Physiotherapy. I will always remain open-minded and will take others opinions into account to inform my decisions in practice. I will continue to promote Physiotherapy to my service users, commissioners, and wider network of colleagues to provide a sustainable future for  the profession as a whole.”

Thanks for taking the time to read my blog if you have any comments please feel free to leave one below or tweet me @LCphysio

Day 1 of the rest of your life!

I have had a pretty hectic week in all fairness and writing this blog has become quite therapeutic to help me find time for me (which is so important whether you are qualified or student, don’t burn yourself out!).  So all of my checks have now gone through so I am now officially employed by UHB! I spoke to my manager yesterday to confirm a start date which is now MONDAY!!! Scary times. Now if that wasn’t scary enough my first rotation is on critical care!! (better get the respiratory books out!) I am very lucky because as a student I worked in the same area so at least I have some idea of where things are. One thing I will be doing is writing down some of the keys things like ABG’s, contraindications and indications for certain treatments as I know that in a new environment sometimes your mind can go completely blank so better to be prepared. I also did this as a student which was useful if I was quizzed by an educator. The things I included were:

  • blood gas values
  • Normal HR, BP, MAP values etc…
  • auscultation sounds
  • mini neuro assessment
  • contraindications for suction
  • contraindications for manual techniques
  • contraindications for manual hyperinflation
  • weaning protocols
  • decannulation protocols
  • Areas of the brain
  • Manchester Mobility Scale.

This is not an extensive list but it really helped me during placement. Alternatively you can now get mini pocket books from Flipio which has the same sort of things in a published book. See link below:

http://www.flipio.co.uk/

I am very excited to get started so I will update you on how my first day goes !!

IMG_0592 IMG_0593 IMG_0594IMG_0595

So last weekend I was running Seth O’Neil’s LBP: Using Sub classification to Achieve Better Patient Management course. The course gave a great insight into LBP classification which could be implemented into practice. I am going to talk about some of the stuff I took from the course . However,because it is my interpretation I will try to reference some of the main sources if you want to learn more as I think I need to go away and read around the topic myself to get a wider understanding. A great place to start would be to listen to Kieran O’Sullivan’s podcast on chronic LBP http://physioedge.com.au/pe-022-chronic-low-back-pain-with-dr-kieran-osullivan/ and the Pain Education Group website. Obviously this is not the only way to treat Lower back pain as there are many other theories but is good to attend courses so you can make an informed choice.

So as pre course reading we were given 2 papers one by Fersum et al 2012 and the other by O’Sullivan 2005. The reasoning behind classifying back pain is similar to any joint, we wouldn’t necessarily treat an OA ankle the same as an inversion sprain? So if we could why would we not classify a patient’s specific LBP problem to help direct our treatments? It is little bit more complicated than that but a good place to start is what pain mechanism is causing the patient’s pain?

So in this case we are going to look at three:

  1. Nociceptive/Mechanical Pain
  2. Peripheral Neuropathic Pain
  3. Centrally Mediated Pain

Nociceptive Pain is from activity in tissues such as muscle, joint,  skin ans viscera and can be classified by pain which is local, sharp/dull, normal aggs and eases (mechanical), predictable, antalgic pattern, absence of dysesthesias i.e. pins and needles or numbness.

Peripheral Neuropathic Pain is caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the peripheral nervous system. Symptoms include dysesthisa, allodynia (pain on non-painful stimulation), hyperalgesia, dermatomal pain and aggs and eases in line with neural tissue. eg. CRPS, Pain generated from the nerve. Physiology of a nerve can generate pain.

Centrally Mediated Pain is caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the central nervous system this can be seen from diffuse/ non anatomic areas of pain on palpation. It may be unpredictable, pain disproportionate to the nature of lesion, strong association with maladaptive psycho-social factors. e.g. fibromyalgia

A great way that Seth explains chronic pain to his patients’ is by stating:

“Firstly your pain is real!! If you can imagine doing a crossword everyday for a year- you get very good at it. This is because your brain gets bigger and creates more neurones in this area due to repetition. Therefore if your brain constantly receives pain signals your brain learns to feel pain better and becomes hard wired. So we need to think of strategies we can use to retrain your brain.”

or you can try this video how to explain pain:

There are many classification systems however this event was focused on O’Sullivan Classification (CB-CFT). Through the Fersum et al study the CB-CFT approach had far superior results compared to normal physio (MT + Exercise).

With AQP affecting MSK services in the UK it is vital we have statistics to back up our treatment effects. To begin patients should be screened using either the StartBack or Oreobro tool (these also have mobile apps).  These tools allow us to see who needs secondary intervention i.e  pain team and it also helps with prioritising  patients. One of the biggest risk factors for chronic back pain is psychological screening. One outcome measure which can be used to monitor LBP is the Oswestry Disability Index (which can be downloaded for free on if you search on Google).

The O’sullivan Classification addresses whether Back pain is:

  • Specific or non- specific
  • maladaptive or adaptive
  • movement impairments vs control behaviour

To understand this you might want to read: Diagnosis of classification of chronic low back pain disorders: maladaptive movement and motor control impairments as underlying mechanism. Peter O’Sullivan 2005.

http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1356689X05001104/1-s2.0-S1356689X05001104-main.pdf?_tid=f8c3a4f8-2c7b-11e3-b396-00000aab0f26&acdnat=1380839851_1c7b2129e94ab33b2cc108d229937340

When assessing a patient why is it that some of us ignore passive movements of the spine whereas if we were looking at a knee joint this would not even cross our mind? So if we don’t assess passive movement of the spine how do we know whether the problem is a movement disorder so loss of movement or a control disorder full ROM but painful. It is is difficult to explain this with out providing images but please refer to the resources available.

Movement Impairment Classification- Management

  • education- regarding pain mechanism
  • reduce fear
  • CBT approach
  • restore movement impairment
  • graded movement restoration
  • graded pain exposure
  • functional restoration
  • normalise movement behaviour

Control Impairment Classification- Management

  • Education- regarding pain mechanism
  • Cognitive behavioural  motor control
  • intervention
  • pain control
  • retrain faulty postures and movements
  • self control of pain
  • functional restoration
  • normalise movement behaviour.

So at large the treatment should be direction specific, control or movement specific and should take into account psych profile.

This post is more to create awareness of the classification as I am aware I need to clarify some of my knowledge so I can further implement this approach into my practice. I think as a new graduate it is difficult to reason through some of these processes without actually getting the chance to assess patients in an MSK setting on a regular basis. One thing I will be trialing will be looking at passive movements to see how this affects my clinical reasoning in practice.

Seth was a fantastic teacher and he had great feedback from the course. Seth is one of the key Physiotherapists on twitter and his feed attracts a lot of UK and international physios so it is well worth a follow @Seth0Neill.

Some other useful resources below are:

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Comments are welcome especially if it involves discussion around Sub-classification of LBP or tweet me @LCphysio

Thank you for taking an interest.

Grab Opportunities With Both Hands!

I just wanted to start this post by saying a massive thank you to everyone who has taken an interest in my blog. So far, I have had over 4000 views which is amazing and totally appreciated.

So this week I went to the CSP West Midlands Regional Network Study day in Worcester (Keep looking on the CSP website for the presentations under West Midlands Regional Network). I am going to discuss what I took from the event. See a few pictures below.

ImageDSCN2348

When I was a student I was the student representative on the West Midlands Regional Network, which I have now passed onto Daniel Jackson (3rd Year Keele who kindly provided the photos). The West Midlands is a very active network and I have continued to have some involvement since qualifying which will be easier now I am staying in Birmingham. At the moment my role on the network is part of communications team which involves engaging members (mainly new grads with what goes on). The network are very welcoming and always like to know what is going on in your work place, so any issues can be fed back to the CSP through our chair Janet Davies or Rep to Council Philip Hulse. The study day kicked off similarly to a normal network meeting, so work place reports were discussed and key points in the CSP council papers and key messages were highlighted (For more information and minutes please go the West Midlands Regional Network http://www.csp.org.uk/nations-regions/west-midlands. The network meetings are great to find out what is happening in the real world of physio (for students)  and it is great way to share good practice or discuss work place issues for (qualified). For me the network meetings are a great opportunity to network and to find out first hand what issues are facing our profession.

I have highlighted presentations in bold so you can pick and choose which sections you read as there is quite a lot to talk about.

Presentation 1-“Professionalism in Today’s Regulatory Climate” Sue England who is the CSP Treasurer and Council Representative (@SueEngland10)

I believe slides will be put on the CSP website. I am not going to discuss everything in the presentation but this is what stuck with me: Firstly discussion of what defines your Scope of practice. Sue suggested it was a good thing to actually write down your scope each year. So what are you trained and competent to carry out? This changes with experience so it is good to know what the limits of your practice are. For me personally by writing down my scope this will highlight areas I need to focus my CPD to aid my career progression.

Secondly was the fact that as a physiotherapist you are an autonomous practitioner, this means any clinical decision you make you must be able to justify whether during assessment, clinical reasoning, treatment plan or record you are involved in. The first line of defense you have if you are pulled up by the HCPC are your notes, this mean they must be accurate, comprehensive and comprehensible ! As a full CSP member you have comprehensive public liability insurance (if you are working within your scope of practice). CSP membership is a bit like RAC/AA cover you don’t want to have to use it but that time you do the costs that would be covered would be equal to a lifetime cover so personally I think it is a small price to pay (fingers crossed I never have to face this!!)

Finally I found a good link to read  is :  http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130402150350/http://ahp.dh.gov.uk/2012/02/27/voicepiece-karen-middleton-chief-health-professions-officer/ . Karen Middleton, Chief Health Professions Offcier, wants AHP’s  to be transparent following recent findings from the Francis report (although most of the findings were centred around nurses, physios need to ensure we don’t miss out on funding for leadership programs or CPD opportunities) . As physio’s we generally are not very good at challenging each others practice, so Karen’s aim is to encourage AHPs to talk about the issue of professional behaviour in a more open and constructive way, which I believe was the main message behind Sue’s presentation.

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2nd Presentation: A Personal Experience of Completing the HCPC CPD Audit- Jane Toms- Communication Lead WMRN and lecturer Coventry University.

I think one of the scariest things to think about as a qualified physiotherapist is being called up by the HCPC for CPD Audit. Each year the HCPC select 2.5 % of the profession to have their portfolio reviewed. Now lets face it physiotherapists are very good at doing CPD, however, if someone was to come and raid you’re house one evening, would it be in an organised manner? If you’re like me I have 3 folders which store everything but I wouldn’t necessarily think it was appropriate to hand into the HCPC. Jane Tom’s presentation gave a great insight into the process and revealed some relieving points.

How she completed it:

  1. Read carefully what was required: Guides,videos and examples from HCPC.
  2. Look at online resources from CSP, HCPC.
  3. Read carefully what is required again
  4. Look at the assessment criteria!!!
  5. Look at portfolio and select most appropriate CPD
  6. Keep cycling through 1-5.

Jane brought in a copy of her submission and it was quite a relief to see a very thin A4 folder!!!  So what was needed in the submission.

  • 500 words about current roles and responsibilities
  • 1500 Words on how she addressed standards 1-4 with evidence to support it.
  • Standard 5 submit it!! You do not need to use all 2000 words!

So a lot less work than you thought? However, do you write the dates of any CPD activities you do?

Standard 1: Maintain a continuous up to date, accurate record of CPD: Basically write a timetable for the last 2 years of things you have done and the nature of the activity, for example formal course, discussion, peer review.

Standard 2: Demonstrate that CPD activities are varied and relevant: so link to nature of the activities you have recorded and then link to why the activities are relevant to your current role (so link this to summary of role).

Standard 3: CPD has contributed to quality of practice and service delivery: Link evidence to a form of evaluation you can do this yourself or by external feedback you may have documented. How has CPD helped your practice.

Standard 4: Seek to ensure CPD benefits the service user. Who are your service users? Basically it could be anyone you come in to contact with so patients, students, staff etc. Try to link to service user feedback eg. cards, emails, patient feedback etc… This is probably the most difficult standard.

So what would Jane do differently next time?

  • don’t feel guilty if portfolio is chaotic
  • endeavor to be less chaotic as this would save time e.g write down CPD in diary.
  • Ask people who give positive feedback to email her- emails provide dated evidence.
  • email colleagues appreciation
  • even more collecting of positive emails, cards and feedback.

Presentation should again be uploaded onto the WMRN page.

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Presentation 3 Achieving CPD Excellence- Sophie Wickens CSP Fieldwork Officer for CPD

So following the previous presentation I think the importance of CPD has been highlighted. CPD is an ongoing process. My CPD has very much focused on how my CPD activity has affected me but I haven’t integrated it into how it has affected my service users, I have said it will but I haven’t evidenced it. A way I could demonstrate my CPD in this way could be what I learnt from working with England Cricket, followed up by documenting an email from Steve McCaig who gave me positive feedback for the work I did and how the players and coaches responded to me.

What are the benefits of demonstrating excellence in your CPD?

  • encourages further learning.
  • HCPC requirement
  • Role model to others.
  • Job satisfaction
  • Become critical about own practice.
  • Make the case to employers of the benefits of attending courses. i.e. applying for funding.
  • a way of influencing commissioners.

What resources are available to you from the CSP?

  • Pebblepad/ eportfolio proformas
  • Frontline
  • ICSP- Case discussions
  • Twitter
  • Championing CPD Scheme
  • CSP Colleagues
  • CPD Champions- reflective cards
  • QA Audit Tool
  • Physiotherapy Framework
  • CPD Syd
  • Specialist physio through professional advice service.
  • Links to specialist library
  • Network meetings
  • Annual Reps Conference
  • Clinical interest groups
  • Physiotherapy UK
  • Physio Journal
  • CSP Briefing papers
  • Website.

So there are a few things to be going on with.

Presentation 4 Top Ten Things you didn’t know about NICE Naomi McVey.

I am mainly going to bullet point some of the things I learnt from this presentation as I don’t have the slides in front of me.

  1. Maybe its just me but did you know the codes on NICE guidelines symbolise the type of paper you are looking at, for example CG- Clinical Guideline QS- Quality Standards PH- Public Health.
  2. The full NICE Guideline provides an in depth report of all the evidence and a summary whereas the web format provides recommendations. Naomi advised to go to the web format first and then follow up with the full guideline if you require more detail.
  3. NICE Quality Standards provide markers of high quality care from the best available evidence, so good to use when looking to implement a quality service.

CPD Opportunities and Resources available from NICE.

Presentation 5 Moving into the driving seat- how physiotherapy can benefit from this current climate Sue Browning CSP Dep Chief Exec.

Change in the NHS is here to stay as we cannot afford to keep doing what we are doing. There is increased competition to provide services, there is a shift to primary and integrated care to promote self-management and there is an increasing demand for quality to be monitored.

Change does bring opportunity: Commissioners are looking for more efficient and better ways of working and there is strong evidence that physio is the answer to many of the major current changes. However, we cannot assume that people know the key role of physio in preventing unnecessary admissions, providing alternative pathways and keeping people independent. Therefore it is our job to go out and take control of this agenda. Everyone has a role we need to understand and look to improve our role, sell ourselves, look for opportunities round local joint strategic needs assessments (JSNA), build support with patient groups (they will be your allies), learn from others and look to the CSP website. Tell the CSP what you need to do this? As a profession we are a team and need to work together.

Finally moving into the driving seat.

  • Physiotherapy has a strong future.
  • We all have a role in creating that future from student to qualified member.
  • Services will change.
  • Seize opportunities
  • Network, network, network and access the support.
  • Regional Networks have important roles.

So as you can see I have taken a lot from one study day I hope you may find some of it useful.

Finally what is happening with me, I recently went to help out at an extra session with West Brom using Functional movement screening to assess players. This worked in my favor as I am now going to be doing some paid work for West Brom, as one of the physios was unable to cover a day so I stepped in (It shows sometimes grasping any hint of opportunity can lead to others). I will do a follow up post for all of this as I feel I have I overloaded this post with information.

Thank you again for taking the time to read my post. Again any comments please leave on the page or tweet me @LCphsyio

Everything happens for a Reason!

So I have now written this post 3 times because things keep changing so quickly. So just to catch up on what I have been doing the last couple of weeks (I hope I can remember everything).

Last week I attended my first training session with West Bromwich Albion, which was more of an induction to get to grips with how things were run. I was working with a physiotherapist called Mel as Nathan the main man was called out with another player in hospital. As a physiotherapist I was involved in the Prehabilitation of players during their warm up, this involved:

  • Sport specific skills including proprioception some of the exercises included were:
  • Hopping to four points with one foot, at each point volleying a football back to the feeder on inside foot, laces and knee/volley. On the return to the middle point the player had to head the ball.
  • Using a wobble cushion dribbling the ball to four cones whilst standing on one foot.
  • Jumping onto wobble boards with cushion upmost. Jumping two feet and one foot.
  • Foam Rolling, quads, hamstrings, ITB, gastroc’s

It is important to encourage injury prevention within the academy and to illustrate its importance. The activities involve challenging core stability and sports specific proprioception. I really enjoyed the session as I haven’t had the opportunity to work on prehab before and I think me and Mel were both thankful for the extra pair of hands as more players turned up than usual. Having enough physiotherapists to players is key to ensure form is correct throughout.

There is now good evidence that a prevention program consisting of a mixture of: Balance training, landing with increased flexion at the knee and hip, controlling body motions especially in deceleration and pivoting manoeuvres, can significantly reduce the number of ACL injuries. So for these players who are at the start off their careers it is vital to educate them on the use of prehab (Brukner, 2012).

http://www.peterbrukner.com/acl-injuries-preventable/

Since my induction I have been on my first proper session which was fantastic. Again the session focused around Prehab at the beginning, some of the exercises we used were:

  • Hopping on one foot onto 6 wobble cushions in a line.
  • Hopping onto on a wobble board cushion side up, jumping onto the ground same foot and then bounding a mini hurdle.
  • Using an agility ladder each player tied their legs together with an elastic band and side stepped through the ladder.
  • Hopping over hurdles in a zigzag pattern and volleying a ball back to the feeder.

We then were able to follow up certain players who needed specific rehab which was great to learn about some sport specific. Next week I will be leading on prehab with another physio and will be assisting with injury prevention screening using Functional exercise movement patterns. So I will follow up with a post on this.

With regards to job interviews I have had two recently, one for Bank work with Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS trust and one for a private company called APOS Therapy. So first for Nottingham, I really was feeling a bit deflated about NHS interviews but I knew it was an opportunity for interview and although it was bank it covered all the rotations I wanted so I knew I had to give it everything. The night before I organised my CPD folder to match the person spec for the job (but of course they didn’t look at it…. Sods law) but anyway, I went in to the interview feeling a lot more relaxed than previous ones (I think it was because I was a bit half-hearted about it all… but it somehow calmed me down). The questions I got asked were:

  • Tell us about your biggest achievement to date?
  • How do you cope with stress? And how does it affect you personally?
  • Tell us about a time when you didn’t meet a deadline? What were the repercussions?
  • Why this trust?
  • What would you assess objectively for a patient with anterior knee pain?
  • How would you go about assessing a patient who has been admitted following a fall? What would you need to know subjectively? Objectively? And what would your management plan and goals be?

There was a few more which have slipped my mind.

From previous interviews I have realised the importance of not getting your hopes up.  On this interview I ensured I paused and composed my thoughts before speaking and I provided comprehensive answers for the two clinical questions. I got home that afternoon and looked at my phone; I had two missed calls from an unknown number followed by a voice mail. It was the therapy lead asking if I could call her back….. So of course I did and was subsequently offered the position! I was so ecstatic, the job was close to home and they were very positive with my feedback which was a real confidence boost. Of course I accepted the offer and then tried to prepare for the next interview still grinning.

Apos Therapy is a fast growing international company which focuses its treatment on correcting biomechanics by wearing some special boots. The product is fantastic and has had some great reviews see website for more information: http://apostherapy.co.uk/en/home . The interview was ok but it did demonstrate the simplicity of my knowledge for biomechanics but it was very interesting. Apos Therapy are very good at investing in people and providing intensive training but I was concerned as a new graduate that specialising to early would not help me to develop my hands on skills as a physiotherapist. So I decided that although I had got through to the second stage of interview at this time the job was not going to work for me, but if an opportunity arose at a later date it would definitely be something I would consider.

So I had decided the Nottingham job was for me and even though I had secured some bank work at Walsall healthcare. Nottingham would mean I could save some money. But then you will never guess what happened next….. Me, Gerard Greene and Tom Astley were just about to head out for drinks in Harborne (about 9pm) when I got a phone call from an unknown number. It was Janet Hallam from the QE ringing to say they could offer me a fixed term contract until the end of January, which could become more permanent if funding became available. I was in complete shock!! So I said I would call back in the morning! Of course I took the job it was the place I wanted to work for from the start and even if nothing comes of it, it is 6 months of NHS work on my CV J!!!

So although I have written this post three times due to circumstances changing, I can honestly say that everything happens for a reason! So hopefully my future blogs will now consist of my experiences as an employed graduate!! On a final note who’s to say networking won’t get you anywhere. Next weekend I will be working with England U19’s Cricket to assist with their injury prevention screening so hopefully this will open even more doors.

Thank you for taking an interest in my blog, feel free to comment or tweet me @lc_physio.

Pictures from the final Rugby Camp at Ellesmere College:

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